Broad Bean Wilt Virus - 1 and 2 (BBWV-1&2) - DAS ELISA          Home    Products    Testing Services   Supplies   Contact Us

Catalog #:  V012
Source Antibody:  Use the combination of two rabbit polyclonal antibodies made against two different serotypes of BBWV-1 and BBWV-2  for both capture and detection in order to cover all viral isolates or strains.
Test Format:  DAS ELISA                                   

Reactivity:  This ELISA based on the polyclonal antibody reacts with both BBWV-1 and BBWV-2 strains. Reaction of the ELISA is strong.  Optical Density at 405nm  is in a range of 1.100 - 3.300 depending  on the virus titer in the samples tested.

Sensitivity:  Sensitivity of the ELISA is high.  The virus can be consistently detected in infected plant tissues diluted  at 1:810 - 2430.

Specificity:  There is no cross reaction with healthy plant tissues. Background is moderately low on the negative control wells.

Application:  The test can be used to detect both strains of BBWV-1 and BBWV-2 in infected plants.

Products: 

Catalog Number

Description Test Wells Price $USD Ship Weight
(Estimated)

V012-R1

ELISA Reagents, Alkaline Phosphatase

500

335

2 lb (1 kg)

V012-R2

ELISA Reagents, Alkaline Phosphatase

1000

575

3 lb (1.5 kg)

V012-R3

ELISA Reagents, Alkaline Phosphatase

5000

2310

12 lb (6 kg)
V012-R4 ELISA Reagents, Alkaline Phosphatase

100

125

1 lb (0.5 kg)
V012-K1 ELISA Kit, Alkaline Phosphatase

500

500

2 lb (1 kg)
V012-K2 ELISA Kit, Alkaline Phosphatase

1000

775

3 lb (1.5 kg)

V012-C1

Coating Antibody

500

165

2 lb (1 kg)

V012-C2

Coating Antibody

1000

300

2 lb (1 kg)

V012-C3

Coating Antibody

5000

1050

2 lb (1 kg)

V012-D1

Detecting conjugate, Alkaline Phosphatase

500

205

2 lb (1 kg)

V012-D2

Detecting conjugate, Alkaline Phosphatase

1000

325

2 lb (1 kg)

V012-D3

Detecting conjugate, Alkaline Phosphatase

5000

1300

2 lb (1 kg)

V012-P1

Positive control

18

20

1 lb (0.5 kg)

V012-N1

Negative control

18

18

1 lb (0.5 kg)
M004-1 Buffers for DAS/TAS, alkaline phosphatase 500 100 2 lb (1.0 kg)
M004-2 Buffers for DAS/TAS, alkaline phosphatase 1000  130 3 lb (1.5 kg)
M004-3 Buffers for DAS/TAS, alkaline phosphatase 5000  400 6 lb (3.0 kg)

It is easy and convenient To Place An Order
To know more about the products:
  Product Items
To learn how to perform the test:
  Instructions for DAS ELISA
To be familiar with other components: Buffer Sets; Controls

Information About the Virus

Name:  Broad Bean Wilt Virus -1 and 2
Acronym:  BBWV-1&2
Synonyms:  catalpa chlorotic leaf spot virus (Schmelzer, 1970), tropaeolum ringspot virus (Cook and Gibbs, 1971), nasturtium ringspot virus, Ringmosaikvirus der Kapuzinerkresse (Frowd and Tomlinson, 1972), petunia ringspot virus (Hull and Plaskitt, 1973; 1974), P.O. pea streak virus, parsley virus 3.
Stains: BBWV-1, BBWV-2.
Group/Genus:  Fabavirus

Vector: Transmitted by a vector; an insect; Acyrthosiphon pisum, Aphis craccivora, A. faba, A. nasturtii, Macrosiphum euphorbiae, M. solanifolii, M. persicae; Aphididae. Transmitted in a non-persistent manner.
Transmission:
  Virus transmitted by mechanical inoculation; not transmitted by seed.
Main natural host plants: Vicia faba, Pisum sativum, Spinacia oleracea, Petroselinum crispum, Tropaeolum majus, Petunia hybrida, Plantago lanceolata.

Virus Infection:  Symptoms include vein clearing, mottling and necrosis of shoot apex, plant wilts, wilting, mottled, mosaic, ringspots, malformed and stunted. Symptoms vary seasonally and vary in different host plants.
Diagnostically susceptible host species and symptoms: Chenopodium amaranticolor, C. quinoa - chlorotic local lesions; tip epinasty, leaves malformed and mottled; Spinacia oleracea - systemic wilt, necrosis and die-back; Vicia faba - apical necrosis, wilting and mosaic; Vigna unguiculata cv. Blackeye - red or chlorotic local lesions; systemic mosaic and malformation.

Geographical distribution: Spreads in the African region, the Eurasian region, the Middle East, the North American region, and the Pacific region; Australia and China. Found, but with no evidence of spread, in Argentina.

References:
1. 
Govier, D.A. (1988). Ann. appl. Biol. 113: 287.
2.  Taylor, R.H. and Stubbs, L.L. (1972). CMI/AAB Descr. Pl. Viruses No. 81, 4 pp.
3. 
Xu, Z.G., Cockbain, A.J., Woods, R.D. and Govier, D.A. (1988). Ann. appl. Biol. 113: 287.


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